Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ktisis.cut.ac.cy/handle/10488/4880
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dc.contributor.authorDoudaki, Vaia-
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-02T09:29:16Z-
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-08T09:14:12Z-
dc.date.available2015-06-02T09:29:16Z-
dc.date.available2015-12-08T09:14:12Z-
dc.date.issued2012-04-05-
dc.identifier.citationThe Journal of International Communication, 2012, vol.18, no. 1, pp. 5-17en_US
dc.identifier.issn2158-3471-
dc.description.abstractThe Sex and the City television series marked a shift in televisual discourse regarding the representation of modern women. Flirting with postfeminist narrative and at the same time distancing itself from it, the show offers complex versions of postmodern female identity. The identities of the show's four main female characters are structured in direct relation to sexual, familial and economic freedom and in opposition to patriarchy. The show openly presents issues of women's sexual emancipation offering, however, specific interpretations of this freedom, through policing sex, normalizing some practices and demonizing others. The potentially unlimited freedom for identity reconstruction – a pledge made by the postmodern era and hosted in the series by New York – is bound to be performed in a field of fertile and yet chaotic contradictions with the individual paying the price of the ambivalent consciousness of the possibility to create new identities.en_US
dc.formatpdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Communicationen_US
dc.subjectCultural studiesen_US
dc.subjectIdentityen_US
dc.subjectTelevision studiesen_US
dc.subjectSex and the Cityen_US
dc.subjectPostmodernismen_US
dc.titleSex and the City: In the Ambivalent Playground of Postmodern Identityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.collaborationCyprus University of Technologyen_US
dc.subject.categoryMedia and Communicationsen_US
dc.journalsOpen Accessen_US
dc.reviewPeer Revieweden
dc.countryCyprusen_US
dc.subject.fieldSocial Sciencesen_US
dc.publicationPeer Revieweden_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13216597.2012.670126en_US
dc.dept.handle123456789/100en
dc.relation.issue1en_US
dc.relation.volume18en_US
cut.common.academicyear2011-2012en_US
dc.identifier.spage5en_US
dc.identifier.epage17en_US
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_6501-
item.openairetypearticle-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
crisitem.author.deptDepartment of Communication and Internet Studies-
crisitem.author.facultyFaculty of Communication and Media Studies-
crisitem.author.orcid0000-0002-6341-9963-
crisitem.author.parentorgFaculty of Communication and Media Studies-
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