Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ktisis.cut.ac.cy/handle/10488/14386
Title: Classification of topography using dem data and its correlation with the geology of Greece
Authors: Kyriakidis, Phaedon 
Zargli, Eleni 
Liodakis, Stelios
Savvaidis, Alexandros 
Keywords: Earthquake Risk;Eurocode;GIS;Terrain Classification
Category: Civil Engineering
Field: Engineering and Technology
Issue Date: 8-Apr-2013
Source: 1st International Conference on Remote Sensing and Geoinformation of the Environment, RSCy 2013, Paphos, Cyprus, 8 April 2013 through 10 April 2013
Conference: International Conference on Remote Sensing and Geoinformation of the Environment 
Abstract: Continuous topography from Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data is frequently segmented into terrain classes based on local morphological characteristics of terrain elevation, e.g., local slope gradient and convexity. The resulting classes are often used as proxies for the average shear wave velocity up to 30 m, and the determination of ground types as required by the Eurocode (EC8) for computing elastic design spectra. In this work, we investigate the links between terrain related variables, particularly slope gradient, extracted for the area of Greece from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 30 arc second global topographic data available from the United States Geological Survey (USGS), with: (a) the global terrain classification product of Iwahashi and Pike (2007) in which 16 terrain types are identified for the same spatial resolution, and (b) information on geological units extracted at the same resolution from the geological map of Greece at a scale of 1/500000 as published from the Institute of Geology and Mineral Exploration (IGME). An interpretation of these links is presented within the context of understanding the reliability of using geology, slope and terrain classes for site characterizations of earthquake risk in a high seismicity area like Greece. Our results indicate that slope is a somewhat biased proxy for solid rocks, whereas in Alluvial deposits the distance to and type of the nearest geological formation appears to provide qualitative information on the size of the sedimentary deposit. © 2013 SPIE.
Description: Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, Volume 8795, 2013, Article number 87950S
URI: https://ktisis.cut.ac.cy/handle/10488/14386
ISBN: 9780819496386
ISSN: 2-s2.0-84883685203
https://api.elsevier.com/content/abstract/scopus_id/84883685203
DOI: 10.1117/12.2028801
Type: Conference Papers
Appears in Collections:Άρθρα/Articles

Show full item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations 50

1
checked on Jan 24, 2020

Page view(s)

21
Last Week
2
Last month
3
checked on Jan 29, 2020

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.