Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ktisis.cut.ac.cy/handle/10488/12621
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorManavopoulos, Vasilis-
dc.contributor.authorTriga, Vasiliki-
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-08T04:54:50Z-
dc.date.available2018-08-08T04:54:50Z-
dc.date.issued2017-09-13-
dc.identifier.citationMedia representations of anti-austerity protests in the EU : grievances, identities and agency, 2017, Pages 117-142en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781134868797-
dc.identifier.urihttp://ktisis.cut.ac.cy/handle/10488/12621-
dc.description.abstractIn the early summer of 2015, it was especially easy to feel frustrated with the state of the Greek media. Polarisation in public discourse reached its apex on 27 June 2015, when Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras announced that a referendum was to be held a mere nine days later, on 5 July. The electorate was to decide whether the government should sign a third economic bailout plan in exchange for a refinancing of the country’s sovereign debt. In an unusual move Tsipras called on the citizens to vote ‘No’, rejecting the proposal his own government had negotiated with its creditors, commonly referred to as the ‘Troika’. Although, by now familiar with what the bulk of a third bailout programme would entail (reductions in government spending and market liberalisation), Greek citizens still had to cast a vote regarding a complex matter with a limited amount of time for deliberation. A fully informed decision would, for example, involve consideration of enigmatic ‘SMP profits’, which were ‘to be transferred from the Eurogroup’, according to the ‘Preliminary Debt Sustainability Analysis’, 1 the second of two annexes to the proposed agreement, after a fifteen-page-long referendum question. Turning to the media for help, citizens could find plentiful calls to resistance or prophesies of doom but little composed and informed analysis as suggested by evidence of previous research on media campaigns in referendums (Brady and Johnston, 2006; DeKavalla, 2016; de Vreese and Semetko, 2002).en_US
dc.formatpdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen_US
dc.rights© 2018 Taylor & Francisen_US
dc.subjectReferendumen_US
dc.subjectEconomic bailout planen_US
dc.subjectGreeceen_US
dc.subjectMediaen_US
dc.titleThe 2015 Greek bailout referendum as a protest action: an analysis of media representations of the 'yes' and 'no' campaignsen_US
dc.typeBook Chapteren_US
dc.doihttps://doi.org/10.4324/9781315542904en_US
dc.collaborationCyprus University of Technologyen_US
dc.subject.categoryMedia and Communicationsen_US
dc.countryCyprusen_US
dc.subject.fieldSocial Sciencesen_US
dc.publicationPeer Revieweden_US
cut.common.academicyear2017-2018en_US
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.languageiso639-1other-
crisitem.author.deptDepartment of Communication and Internet Studies-
crisitem.author.deptDepartment of Communication and Internet Studies-
crisitem.author.facultyFaculty of Communication and Media Studies-
crisitem.author.facultyFaculty of Communication and Media Studies-
crisitem.author.orcid0000-0001-6932-5389-
crisitem.author.parentorgFaculty of Communication and Media Studies-
crisitem.author.parentorgFaculty of Communication and Media Studies-
Appears in Collections:Κεφάλαια βιβλίων/Book chapters
Show simple item record

Page view(s) 50

105
Last Week
1
Last month
2
checked on Sep 18, 2019

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.