Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://ktisis.cut.ac.cy/handle/10488/10931
Title: Probing the Evolution of Retained Austenite in TRIP Steel During Strain-Induced Transformation: A Multitechnique Investigation
Authors: Haidemenopoulos, G. N. 
Constantinou, Marios 
Kamoutsi, H. 
Krizan, Daniel 
Bellas, I. 
Koutsokeras, Loukas E. 
Constantinides, Georgios 
Keywords: Austenite;Particle size;Particle size analysis;Plasticity;Saturation magnetization;Steel testing;Tensile testing;X ray diffraction analysis
Category: Materials Engineering
Field: Engineering and Technology
Issue Date: 1-Jul-2018
Publisher: Minerals, Metals and Materials Society
Source: JOM, 2018, Volume 70, Issue 6, Pages 924-928
Abstract: X-ray diffraction analysis, magnetic force microscopy, and the saturation magnetization method have been employed to study the evolution of the percentage and size of retained austenite (RA) particles during strain-induced transformation in a transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel. A low-alloy TRIP-700 steel with nominal composition Fe-0.2C-0.34Si-1.99Mn-1Al (mass%) was subjected to interrupted tensile testing at strain levels of 0–22% and the microstructure subsequently studied. The results of the three experimental techniques were in very good agreement regarding the estimated austenite volume fraction and its evolution with strain. Furthermore, this multitechnique approach revealed that the average particle size of RA reduced as the applied strain was increased, suggesting that larger particles are less stable and more susceptible to strain-induced phase transformation. Such experimentally determined evolution of the austenite size with strain could serve as an input to kinetic models that aim to predict the strain-induced transformation in low-alloy TRIP steels.
URI: http://ktisis.cut.ac.cy/handle/10488/10931
ISSN: 10474838
DOI: 10.1007/s11837-018-2832-1
Rights: © 2018 The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society
Type: Article
Appears in Collections:Άρθρα/Articles

Show full item record

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.