Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ktisis.cut.ac.cy/handle/10488/9532
Title: Treatment of metalworking fluids using a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR)
Authors: Teli, Aronne 
Vyrides, Ioannis 
Stuckey, David C. 
Keywords: Anaerobic digestion;Bioreactors;Industrial effluents;Membranes;Metal working fluids (MWFs);Solid/liquid separation
Category: Biological Sciences
Field: Natural Sciences
Issue Date: 1-Mar-2015
Publisher: John Wiley and Sons Ltd
Source: Journal of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology, 2015, Volume 90, Issue 3, Pages 507-513
metadata.dc.doi: 10.1002/jctb.4339
Abstract: BACKGROUND: The role of biodegradation and physical-chemical mechanisms involved in the treatment of metal working fluids (MWFs) using a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR) was assessed in this research. Two SAMBRs were employed in series, with the second SAMBR being fed the permeate from the first bioreactor. RESULTS: Results showed a low biodegradability of the MWF both in batch tests (bioconversion efficiency≤3%), and operating the bioreactors continuously (bioconversion efficiency ∼0%). Among the physical-chemical removal mechanisms identified, it was found that bio-adhesion was the most important in MWF removal (removal rate of 96.0±1.64%), whereas membrane rejection was not significant (removal rate of 0.2±0.18%). However, it is expected that membrane separation will play an important role in removal after bio-adhesion has been saturated. CONCLUSION: The inhibition of the hydrolytic/heteroacetogenic biomass was the most problematic aspect in anaerobic digestion, resulting in the need for bioaugmentation of specific microorganisms to degrade MWFs. In the case of non-adaptation during long-term operation, the bio-adhesive propensity of MWFs could be used as a potential method for removing spent MWFs from wastewater streams.
URI: http://ktisis.cut.ac.cy/handle/10488/9532
ISSN: 02682575
Rights: © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.
Type: Article
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