Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ktisis.cut.ac.cy/handle/10488/8846
Title: Don’t Read My Lips: Assessing Listening and Speaking Skills Through Play with a Humanoid Robot
Authors: Polycarpou, Panayiota
Andreeva, Anna
Ioannou, Andri 
Zaphiris, Panayiotis 
Keywords: NAO
Humanoid robot
Social robot
Robotics
Special education
Listening skills
Speaking skills
Speech assessment
Hearing impairment
Deaf
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Springer International Publishing AG
Source: HCI International 2016 – Posters' Extended Abstracts, 18th International Conference, HCI International 2016 Toronto, Canada, July 17–22, 2016 Proceedings, Part II, Pages 255-260
Abstract: This study investigates the potential of using the humanoid robot, NAO, as a playful tool for assessing the listening and speaking skills of seven hearing-impaired students who use cochlear implant(s) and sign language as their main communication modality. NAO does not have a human mouth and therefore, students cannot do lip-reading; we considered this to be a unique characteristic of the technology that can help make the assessment of listening and speaking skills efficient and accurate. Three game-like applications were designed and deployed on NAO for the purpose of this study. Results demonstrated how NAO was successfully used in this context. Our results, although preliminary, should encourage future research in the area of listening and speaking assessment for hearing impaired children, as well as speech enhancement via play with social robots.
Description: 18th International Conference, HCI International 2016 Toronto, Canada, July 17–22, 2016
URI: http://ktisis.cut.ac.cy/jspui/handle/10488/8846
ISBN: Print : 978-3-319-40541-4
ISSN: Online : 978-3-319-40542-1
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-40542-1_41
Rights: © Springer International Publishing AG, Part of Springer Science+Business Media
Appears in Collections:Κεφάλαια βιβλίων/Book chapters

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