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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ktisis.cut.ac.cy/jspui/handle/10488/5831

Title: Popularity versus similarity in growing networks
Authors: Papadopoulos, Fragkiskos
???metadata.dc.subject.field???: Engineering and Technology
???metadata.dc.subject.category???: Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Keywords: Applied physics
Engineering
Physics
Issue Date: 2012
Publisher: Macmillan Publishers
Citation: Nature, 2012, Volume 489, Number 7417, Pages 537–540
Abstract: The principle that popularity is attractive underlies preferential attachment, which is a common explanation for the emergence of scaling in growing networks. If new connections are made preferentially to more popular nodes, then the resulting distribution of the number of connections possessed by nodes follows power laws as observed in many real networks. Preferential attachment has been directly validated for some real networks (including the Internet), and can be a consequence of different underlying processes based on node fitness, ranking, optimization, random walks or duplication. Here we show that popularity is just one dimension of attractiveness; another dimension is similarity. We develop a framework in which new connections optimize certain trade-offs between popularity and similarity, instead of simply preferring popular nodes. The framework has a geometric interpretation in which popularity preference emerges from local optimization. As opposed to preferential attachment, our optimization framework accurately describes the large-scale evolution of technological (the Internet), social (trust relationships between people) and biological (Escherichia coli metabolic) networks, predicting the probability of new links with high precision. The framework that we have developed can thus be used for predicting new links in evolving networks, and provides a different perspective on preferential attachment as an emergent phenomenon.
???metadata.dc.type.*???: Article
ISSN: 0028-0836
1476-4687
???metadata.dc.doi???: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature11459
???metadata.dc.subject.collaboration???: Cyprus University of Technology
???metadata.dc.subject.country???: Cyprus
???metadata.dc.subject.journals???: Subscription Journal
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