Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ktisis.cut.ac.cy/handle/10488/4361
Title: Neurodevelopmental outcome of fetuses with increased nuchal translucency and apparently normal prenatal and/or postnatal assessment: a systematic review
Authors: Sotiriadis, Alexandros 
Papatheodorou, Stefania 
Makrydimas, George V.
Keywords: Neurodevelopment
Nuchal translucency
Ultrasound
Issue Date: Jan-2012
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Source: Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2012, Volume 39, Issue 1, Volume 39, Pages 10–19
Abstract: Objectives: To systematically review and, when feasible, pool, published data regarding the prevalence of childhood neurodevelopmental delay in fetuses with increased first-trimester nuchal translucency (NT), normal karyotype and absence of structural defects or identifiable syndromes. Methods: MEDLINE and SCOPUS searches using combinations of the terms 'nuchal translucency' AND 'outcome*' were complemented by perusal of the references of the retrieved articles and an additional automated search using the 'search for related articles' PubMed function. Only children with a normal karyotype and no structural defects or syndromic abnormalities were included in the analysis. Between-studies heterogeneity was assessed using the I 2 statistic. Results: The total prevalence of developmental delay in all 17 studies was 28/2458 (1.14%; 95% CI, 0.79-1.64; I 2 = 57.6%). Eight studies (n = 1567) used NT > 99th centile as the cut-off; 15 children (0.96%; 95% CI, 0.58-1.58%) were reported as having developmental delay (I 2 = 72.2%). Four studies (n = 669) used the 95 th centile as the cut-off for increased NT; seven children (1.05%; 95% CI, 0.51-4.88%) were reported as having developmental delay (I 2 = 29.2%). Five studies used 3.0 mm as the cut-off for increased NT; the pooled rate of developmental delay was six of 222 children (2.70%; 95% CI, 1.24-5.77%; I 2 = 0.0%). Conclusion The rate of neurodevelopmental delay in children with increased fetal NT, a normal karyotype, normal anatomy and no identifiable genetic syndromes does not appear to be higher than that reported for the general population. More large-scale, prospective case-control studies would be needed to enhance the robustness of the results.
URI: http://ktisis.cut.ac.cy/jspui/handle/10488/4361
http://hdl.handle.net/10488/4361
ISSN: 1469-0705
DOI: 10.1002/uog.10143
Rights: © ISUOG
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