Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ktisis.cut.ac.cy/handle/10488/4224
Title: Association of drinking-water source and use characteristics with urinary antimony concentrations
Authors: Andra, Syam S. 
Herrick, Lisa 
Snyder, Shane A. 
Hauser, Russ B. 
Makris, Konstantinos C. 
Christophi, Costas A. 
Keywords: Antimony;Biomarker;Bottled water;Drinking-water;Polycarbonate;Polyethylene terephthalate
Category: Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Field: Natural Sciences
Issue Date: Mar-2013
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Source: Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology, 2013, Volume 23, Issue 2, Pages 120-127
Abstract: Environmental factors, such as storage time, frequency of bottle reuse and temperature, have been shown to facilitate antimony (Sb) leaching from water- and food-packaging materials. The globally escalating consumption of water packaged in Sb-containing bottles, such as that of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), could increase human daily Sb doses. This study set out to investigate the relationship between drinking-water source, use characteristics, and urinary Sb concentrations (U-Sb) accompanied with survey responses of a healthy (n=35) Cypriot participant pool. One spot urine sample was collected during administration of questionnaire, while a second spot urine sample was collected from the same individual about 7 days later. Urinary and water Sb concentrations were measured with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Survey responses showed that bottled water summed over various volumes and plastic types, such as polycarbonate and PET contributed to an average 61% of daily water consumption. Water sources such as tap, mobile stations (explained in a following section), and well water contributed to 24%, 14%, and 2% of an individual's daily water consumption pattern, respectively. Average daily potable water use of both bottled and tap water by individuals consisted of 65% drinking-water, while the remaining 35% was water used for preparing cold and hot beverages, such as, tea, coffee, and juices. A significant (P=0.02) association between per capita water consumption from PET bottles and urinary creatinine-unadjusted concentrations was observed, but this relationship did not remain after inclusion of covariates in a multivariate regression model. In the creatinine-adjusted regression model, only gender (female) was a significant (P<0.01) predictor of U-Sb, after adjusting for several covariates. It is proposed that consumption data collection on various water uses and sources among individuals could perhaps decrease the uncertainty associated with derivations of acceptable daily Sb intakes.
URI: http://ktisis.cut.ac.cy/handle/10488/4224
ISSN: 1559-064X
DOI: 10.1038/jes.2012.104
Rights: © Nature America, Inc.
Type: Article
Appears in Collections:Άρθρα/Articles

Show full item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations 20

8
checked on Nov 16, 2017

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations 10

9
checked on Nov 16, 2017

Page view(s)

23
Last Week
1
Last month
0
checked on Nov 20, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.