Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ktisis.cut.ac.cy/handle/10488/1239
Title: Attitudes of management students towards workplace ethics: A comparative study between South Africa and Cyprus
Attitudes of management students towards workplace ethics: A comparative study between South Africa and Cyprus
Authors: Thomas, Adele 
Zopiatis, Anastasios 
Krambia-Kapardis, Maria 
Thomas, Adele 
Keywords: South Africa
Cyprus
Ethics
Management
Culture
Quantitative survey
Open access publishing
South Africa
Cyprus
Ethics
Management
Culture
Quantitative survey
Open access publishing
Issue Date: 2008
Publisher: Medknow
Medknow
Source: African Journal of Business Ethics, 2008, Vol. 3 No. 1,
African Journal of Business Ethics, 2008, Vol. 3 No. 1,
Abstract: In order to understand attitudes towards work-related ethics and the teaching of business ethics in management programmes at universities, a survey was conducted with management students at two universities, one in the Republic of Cyprus (hereafter referred to as Cyprus) and the other in the Republic of South Africa (hereafter referred to as South Africa). An attempt was also made to investigate whether such differences, if any, were linked to differences in national culture. The findings indicate that no significant differences between the two samples exist on four of the five dimensions of national culture (Hofstede, 1994) and, accordingly, differences in attitudes towards workplace ethical issues cannot be said to be linked to this variable. Significant differences were found between the two samples on certain questionnaire items that related to workplace practices with the Cypriot sample, more so than the South African sample, appearing to be willing to engage in certain workplace practices that would be deemed unethical in society. It is recommended that ethics education be integral to a business curriculum and that teaching methodologies explore ways in which to develop moral reasoning in students.
In order to understand attitudes towards work-related ethics and the teaching of business ethics in management programmes at universities, a survey was conducted with management students at two universities, one in the Republic of Cyprus (hereafter referred to as Cyprus) and the other in the Republic of South Africa (hereafter referred to as South Africa). An attempt was also made to investigate whether such differences, if any, were linked to differences in national culture. The findings indicate that no significant differences between the two samples exist on four of the five dimensions of national culture (Hofstede, 1994) and, accordingly, differences in attitudes towards workplace ethical issues cannot be said to be linked to this variable. Significant differences were found between the two samples on certain questionnaire items that related to workplace practices with the Cypriot sample, more so than the South African sample, appearing to be willing to engage in certain workplace practices that would be deemed unethical in society. It is recommended that ethics education be integral to a business curriculum and that teaching methodologies explore ways in which to develop moral reasoning in students.
URI: http://ktisis.cut.ac.cy/handle/10488/1239
http://ktisis.cut.ac.cy/handle/10488/1239
ISSN: 1817-7417
1817-7417
Rights: © African Journal of Business Ethics
� African Journal of Business Ethics
Appears in Collections:Άρθρα/Articles

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