Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ktisis.cut.ac.cy/handle/10488/10578
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGillon, Gail-
dc.contributor.authorHyter, Yvette -
dc.contributor.authorFernandes, Fernanda Dreux -
dc.contributor.authorFerman, Sara-
dc.contributor.authorHus, Yvette-
dc.contributor.authorPetinou, Kakia-
dc.contributor.authorSegald, Osnat-
dc.contributor.authorTumanova, Tatjana -
dc.contributor.authorVogindroukas, Ioannis -
dc.contributor.authorWestby, Carol -
dc.contributor.authorWesterveld, Marleen-
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-11T12:09:30Z-
dc.date.available2018-01-11T12:09:30Z-
dc.date.issued2017-12-01-
dc.identifier.citationFolia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, Volume 69, Issue 1-2, 1 December 2017, Pages 8-19en_US
dc.identifier.issn10217762-
dc.identifier.urihttp://ktisis.cut.ac.cy/handle/10488/10578-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental impairment. To better understand the role of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in different countries in supporting children with ASD, the International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics (IALP) Child Language Committee developed a survey for SLPs working with children or adolescents with ASD. Method and Participants: The survey comprised 58 questions about background information of respondents, characteristics of children with ASD, and the role of SLPs in diagnosis, assessment, and intervention practices. The survey was available in English, French, Russian, and Portuguese, and distributed online. Results: This paper provides a descriptive summary of the main findings from the quantitative data from the 1,114 SLPs (representing 35 countries) who were supporting children with ASD. Most of the respondents (91%) were experienced in working with children with ASD, and the majority (75%) worked in schools or early childhood settings. SLPs reported that the children’s typical age at diagnosis of ASD on their caseload was 3–4 years, completed mostly by a professional team. Conclusions: The results support positive global trends for SLPs using effective practices in assessment and intervention for children with ASD. Two areas where SLPs may need further support are involving parents in assessment practices, and supporting literacy development in children with ASD.en_US
dc.formatpdfen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherS. Karger AGen_US
dc.rights© 2017 S. Karger AG, Baselen_US
dc.subjectSpeech-language pathologistsen_US
dc.subjectAutism spectrum disorderen_US
dc.subjectSurveyen_US
dc.subjectAssessmenten_US
dc.subjectInterventionen_US
dc.subjectDiagnosisen_US
dc.subjectAutismen_US
dc.subjectChildrenen_US
dc.subjectAdolescentsen_US
dc.titleInternational Survey of Speech-Language Pathologists' Practices in Working with Children with Autism Spectrum Disorderen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.doi10.1159/000479063en_US
dc.collaborationUniversity of Canterburyen_US
dc.collaborationWestern Michigan Universityen_US
dc.collaborationUniversity of Sao Pauloen_US
dc.collaborationTel Aviv Universityen_US
dc.collaborationTAV Collegeen_US
dc.collaborationCyprus University of Technologyen_US
dc.collaborationMoscow State University of Educationen_US
dc.collaborationResearch and Education Institute for Speech Therapyen_US
dc.collaborationBilingual Multicultural Servicesen_US
dc.collaborationGriffith Universityen_US
dc.subject.categoryClinical Medicineen_US
dc.journalsSubscription Journalen_US
dc.countryNew Zealanden_US
dc.countryUSAen_US
dc.countryBrazilen_US
dc.countryIsraelen_US
dc.countryCanadaen_US
dc.countryCyprusen_US
dc.countryRussian Federationen_US
dc.countryGreeceen_US
dc.countryAustraliaen_US
dc.subject.fieldMedical and Health Sciencesen_US
dc.publicationPeer Revieweden_US
cut.common.academicyear2017-2018en_US
Appears in Collections:Άρθρα/Articles
Show simple item record

Page view(s)

27
checked on Jan 19, 2018

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.