Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ktisis.cut.ac.cy/handle/10488/10066
Title: Lung cancer and tobacco smoking in Crete, Greece: reflections from a population-based cancer registry from 1992 to 2013
Authors: Sifaki-Pistolla, Dimitra I. 
Lionis, Christos D. 
Georgoulias, Vasileios 
Kyriakidis, P. 
Koinis, Filippos 
Aggelaki, S. 
Tzanakis, Nikolaos E. 
Keywords: Lung cancer;Tobacco smoking
Category: Health Sciences
Field: Medical and Health Sciences
Issue Date: 19-Jan-2017
Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd.
Source: Tobacco Induced Diseases, 2017, Volume 15, Issue 1, Pages 1-10
metadata.dc.doi: 10.1186/s12971-017-0114-2
Abstract: Background: The Cancer Registry of Crete is a regional population database that collects cancer morbidity/mortality data along with several risk factors. The current study assessed the geographical variation of lung cancer among ever and never smokers in Crete during the last 20 years. Method: Lung cancer patient records (1992-2013) including information on medical history and smoking habits were obtained from the Cancer Registry of Crete. Age-Adjusted Incidence Rates (AAIR), prevalence of smoking among lung cancer patients and the Population-Attributable Fraction (PAF%) of tobacco smoking were estimated. Kaplan-Meier curves, grouped per smoking status were constructed, and spatio-temporal analyses were carried out to assess the geographical variations of lung cancer and smoking (a = 0.05). Results: New lung cancer cases in Crete accounted for 9% of all cancers (AAIRboth genders = 40.2/100,000/year, AAIRmales = 73.1/100,000/year, AAIRfemales = 11.8/100,000/year). Ever smokers presented significantly higher incidence compared to ex-smokers (p = 0.02) and never smokers (p < 0.001). The highest increase was observed in ever smokers (AAIR1992 = 19.2/100,000/year, AAIR2013 = 25.4/100,000/year, p = 0.03), while never smokers presented the lowest increase from 1992 to 2013 (AAIR1992 = 5.3/100,000/year, AAIR2013 = 6.8/100,000/year, p = 0.2). The PAF% of lung cancer mortality is 86% for both genders (males: 89%, females: 78%). AAIRs ranged from 25 to 50/100,000/year, while significant geographical differences were observed among the municipalities of Crete (p = 0.02). Smokers living in the south-east urban regions presented higher risk of dying from lung cancer (RR = 2.2; 95%CI = 1.3-3.5). Conclusions: The constant increase of lung cancer rates among both genders, especially in females, outlines the need for targeted, geographically-oriented, life-style preventive measures. Design of population-based screening programs, tobacco awareness campaigns and smoking cessation programs in lung cancer hot spots could be guide by these findings.
URI: http://ktisis.cut.ac.cy/handle/10488/10066
ISSN: 16179625
Rights: © 2017 The Author(s).
Type: Article
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